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How to Make Crepes – Even the Messed-Up Ones Will Be Perfect!


Crepe

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How to Make Crepes – Even the Messed-Up Ones Will Be Perfect!

With a blog name like Food Wishes, and a closing video credit that asks, “what is your food wish?” – I do get lots of requests for video recipes. Probably the most common request that I hadn’t done yet was for a “how to make crepes” video. Well, today is the day. 

I’ve never understood the fear and mystery that surrounds this thin round of ground flour, milk, and egg. It’s one of the first things you make in culinary school (that works), and probably the first French recipe one commits to memory. It does take a few practice crepes to get a feel for the pan and heat, but once you have a couple successfully finished, you are set for life.

By the way, forget those scenes in movies, and TV, where the “chef” is flipping them in the air to turn them. This is all for show. Just use a spatula and turn them over – sort of like a toasted cheese sandwich. Also, stop being a perfectionist in the kitchen; you’ll have more fun. I know you; if you try these you want them to be perfectly round, perfectly thin, and perfectly colored. Relax, Martha.

Perfect rarely happens in the kitchen – before the food is plated, at least. The most imperfectly shaped crepe once folded up with jam, fried in butter, and eaten with ice cream, is always perfect. As I say in the video, this is just the first step. I will do another demo on what to do with these perfect crepes soon. Stay tuned, and enjoy!

Ingredients:
1 cup flour
2 eggs
1 1/4 cup milk
2 tbsp oil
1/4 tsp salt

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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French Toast – The Fancy Brunch Restaurant Style Foodwishes Cooking Recipe


Pumpkin pain perdu or "lost bread" a...

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French Toast – The Fancy Brunch Restaurant Style

So, you think you know how to make French toast? Maybe you beat a couple eggs, a splash of milk, a quick dip, fry it up in some butter, drizzle with a little syrup? Sounds pretty good, and for 95% of the world that is what they consider “French Toast.” But, if you want truly amazing French toast, give this classic restaurant method a try. 

The main difference is the bread is sliced thicker, it’s soaked in a custard batter (really, really soaked), and then after being brown slightly in a pan, it’s baked. That is the real secret. The baking cooks the custard inside the bread and gives it an unbelievable texture. The outside is crisp and golden, and the contrast between the two is magical. The problem with just pan-frying is by the time the inside is really cooked, the outside is too dark and bitter. You can use thinner bread, of course, but then you don’t get the same creamy, custardy, almost bread pudding-like texture, as from the thicker slices. Give this a try. The one extra step of baking it is sooo worth it. When you bite into this, I’m sure you’ll agree. Enjoy!

Ingredients:
6 thick slice of French bread
2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
pinch of salt
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
butter for frying
maple syrup?

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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It Takes Some Huevos to Cook on a Ranch Food Wishes Cooking Recipe


Huevos Rancheros

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Bored with breakfast? Huevos rancheros, or ranch-style eggs, is a hearty, healthy, and very delicious breakfast. Watch how easy it is to make a fresh ranchero sauce, the key ingredient in this classic Mexican meal.

 

It Takes Some Huevos to Cook on a Ranch

I was very excited when I saw Huevos Rancheros on my assignment list for About.com. It’s one of those breakfast recipes that I love, but never remember to make.

Huevos Rancheros simplemeans ranch-style eggs, and if you’ve ever worked on a ranch, like I have (I picked corn one summer), you understand the importance of a hearty breakfast.

There are many variations of this dish, all which includes some kind of eggs topped with some kind of tomato and chili-based sauce. This video recipe shows a fairly traditional preparation with two slight twists. I like my ranchero sauce kind of smooth – where as most classic versions are quite chunky. Also, instead of the plain tortilla base, I slip in a slice of cheese for a little quesadilla action.

If you decide to go ahead and try this (and when you see the money shot at the end, you really won’t have much choice), you should follow my lead and have it with the rice and beans. I love homefries the much as the next ranch hand, but there’s something about the way the egg yolk and ranchero sauce mix together that works so well with frijoles refritos and arroz.

Since this recipe was produced for About, the following video link will take you off the site to watch the video, just don’t forget to come back. Enjoy!


Ingredients:
1 tbsp of tomato paste
1 tsp of vegetable oil
1/2 cup diced onions
big pinch of salt
2/3 cup diced green chilies – combination of hot or sweet i.e.jalapeno & Fresno chilies
2 cloves minced garlic
1/2 tsp chili powder
2 tsp oregano
14.5-oz diced tomatoes
1/2 cup of water
salt and cayenne pepper
Corn tortillas
Pepper jack cheese
2 eggs
Cilantro

 

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Food Wishes Recipes: King Ranch Chicken Casserole Recipe – How to Make King Ranch Chicken


Green bean casserole

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King Ranch Casserole – Revenge is a Dish Best Served Ironically Named

There are three things all real Texans love: high school football, executing people, and the King Ranch casserole. From what I hear, it’s impossible to go to any sort of potluck and not see one of these.

I love posting about these regional culinary favorites, especially when no one knows for sure where the name came from. It allows me to put forth my own, often ridiculous, theory. There is indeed a King Ranch in Texas – they say it’s one of the most famous ranches in the world, but as far as claiming credit for inventing this casserole goes, they’re not interested. You can’t really blame them…a legendary cattle ranch the birthplace of a famous chicken recipe? I don’t think so.

Here’s what I bet happened. You don’t build a cattle ranch without making a few enemies along the way. To get revenge, someone invented this dish and called it the King Ranch casserole just to annoy them. It was a brilliant plan. Without firing a shot, or bloodying a knuckle, they inflicted the ultimate cattleman humiliation.

Regarding this recipe, I have a few things to explain. I’m testing it for the cookbook, and so I wanted to stay true to the original formula, which explains the cans of soup. Also, as you’ll hear me say in the video, I tried to add an extra layer of tortilla on the bottom, which was a mistake. It threw off the meat to grain to condensed soup ratio. Two layers are plenty; so if you make it, take note.

Lastly, since condensed soup is dangerously high in sodium, I didn’t add any, but after sampling I decided that it did need some after all. Best to taste the sauce mixture and decide for yourself. Enjoy!

Meat from one cooked chicken
10 corn tortillas
1 white onion, diced
1 red bell pepper, diced
1 green bell pepper, diced
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
8 oz cheddar cheese, grated
1 can of cream of mushroom soup
1 can of cream of chicken soup
1 cup of chicken broth
1 can Ro-Tel diced tomatoes with green chilies
2 tablespoons sour cream
2 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon ancho chile powder
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon chipotle
1 teaspoon salt, maybe

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Predicting the Super Bowl Winner with Chicken Wing Bones


Tamara Taylor, David Boreanaz, Michaela Conlin...

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Predicting the Super Bowl Winner with Chicken Wing Bones

I feel kind of guilty. I’ve been publishing this blog for four years now, and I this is the first time I’m letting you in on my magical method for picking the Super Bowl winner. I can’t tell you how or where I learned how to do this (long story short, I’d be killed by a very tall, dreadlocked gypsy if I did), but I can tell you it’s a sure thing.

Normally, I’d never give insane advice like withdraw your children’s college funds, and bet everything on the game, but here, it would be crazy not to. 😉 Enjoy!

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Food Wishes Recipes: Chicken Fettuccine Alfredo Recipe – How to Make Chicken Fettuccine Alfredo


I like it when the cheese starts to stick. Tha...

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Make some delicious Chicken Fettuccine Alfredo! Visit http://foodwishes.com to get the ingredients and more info, and watch over 350 free video recipes. Thanks and enjoy!

Food Wishes Recipes: Chicken Fettuccine Alfredo Recipe – How to Make Chicken Fettuccine Alfredo

Chicken Fettuccine Alfredo – Since it was Loose, You Must Reduce

I usually don’t film things I’m trying for the first time. There is so much set up involved, and time invested when I do one of these video recipes, that it’s just too painful to have something not work and end up with nothing to show for all the effort.

I thought this chicken fettuccine Alfredo recipe was going to fit that description. I’m putting this recipe in the cookbook, and I wanted to try one that uses chicken broth, the same one used to poach the breasts, in place of some of the heavy cream.

I was so sure I had the right proportions that I decided to film it without a test. I was wrong, or as the kids say these days…Fail (which by the way, is getting really annoying, so cut it out).

The dish tasted great; the fortified chicken broth worked perfectly as a partial cream substitute, and I also managed to not use any butter or olive oil – another goal of this recipe. The problem, as you’ll see, is I simply had twice as much chicken broth as I needed.

So, in case I’m not clear in the video. You poach the breasts in 2 cups of broth, but before you continue with the recipe, boil that poaching liquid down to 1 cup and you will be in slightly-less-caloric chicken fettuccine Alfredo heaven.

Also, be sure to undercook the pasta by at least a minute, so you can allow it to absorb the sauce at the end, as it rests covered. The last piece of advice you’ve heard before… DO NOT attempt this recipe unless you have a nice hunk of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. It’s like the main ingredient, so that green can is not going to cut it. Enjoy!

Ingredients for 4 large servings:
2 large chicken breasts
2 cups low sodium organic chicken broth
1 pound fettuccine
2 cups heavy cream
4 cloves garlic, very finely minced
2 large egg yolks
1/4 cup chopped Italian parsley (in summer toss some nice fresh basil in for a little different version)
2 cups freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Food Wishes Recipes: Chocolate Egg Cream – New York’s Famous Chocolate Egg Cream Drink


White chocolate is marketed by confectioners a...

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Learn how to make New York‘s Famous Chocolate Egg Cream Recipe! Visithttp://foodwishes.com to get more info, and watch over 400 free video recipes. I hope you enjoy this Chocolate Egg Cream Recipe!

 

Food Wishes Recipes: Chocolate Egg Cream – New York’s Famous Chocolate Egg Cream Drink Recipe:

Chocolate, Egg, and Cream? Fuggeddaboutit!

This chocolate egg cream video was inspired by our recent trip to New York City, where my wife Michele and I enjoyed them on several occasions. As I watched the expression on her face while she sipped this unique treat, I knew I had to film a quick how-to as soon as we returned.

Contrary to the name of this New York City soda fountain classic, chocolate egg creams do not contain any eggs or cream. What is does contain is Fox‘s “U-bet” chocolate “flavor” syrup.

This uniquely American ingredient hails from Brooklyn, New York, and despite the picture of the woman on the label (why is she looking at me like that?), I love the flavor of this syrup. If you can’t find it, I’m sure a certain brand from Pennsylvania will do just fine.

Along with the chocolate come the simple additions of milk and seltzer water. The magic of this drink is how the minimalist design produces such a rich, yet refreshing chocolate beverage. In fact, one of the reasons the beverage was so popular in its time, it was considered a cure for indigestion!

There are all sorts of arguments about the origins of this drink (when it comes to sports and food, New Yorkers do seem to enjoy a good debate), but most chocolate soda fountain drink historians think this was invented somewhere in Brooklyn, in the 1920’s.

The technique is very simple, and as I suggest in the video, you’ll want to adjust the trio of ingredients to the ratio that you find most satisfying. Some prefer this very light and frosty with extra milk, others go for the darker, flatter and richer.

Enjoy!

Ingredients per glass:
1-2 oz chocolate syrup
1-2 oz cold milk
8-10 oz very cold seltzer water

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Chef interview with Foodwishes cook: Chef John


A Shorty Interview with Chef John

Thanks to many loyal readers of this blog, and my beloved YouTube channel fans, I’m proud to announce @FoodWishes (as I’m known on Twitter) is currently in 5th place for Shorty Awards nominations! I hear the top 5 finishers get an invite to NYC for the ceremony, so if you haven’t voted, here’s the link.

The following is an interview I did as part of the nomination process, and I thought I would repost it here. Enjoy!

What’s your best tweet?
I love them all. That’s like asking Octomom which child is her favorite.

What are six things you could never do without?
the other half of the twelve-pack

How do you use Twitter in your professional life?
To promote new (and totally awesome, if I do say) video recipes I’ve just produced.

What’s your favorite Twitter app?
What’s a Twitter app?

Twitter or Facebook?
Twitter! Facebook sucks. No offense.

What was the funniest trend you’ve seen?
Twitpics of food from really dark restaurants. It all looks like corned beef hash.

What feature should Twitter add?
With one click, you can delete another user’s Twitter account if you think it’s lame.

Who do you wish had a Twitter feed but doesn’t?
That guy that does the 6 Flags commercials.

What are some words or phrases you refuse to shorten for brevity?
“the” and “notwithstanding”

Is there someone you want to follow you who doesn’t already? If so, who?
Top Chef host @PadmaLakshmi. She has 19,428 followers and only follows 74 people. You do the math.

Have you ever unfollowed someone? Who and why?
Yes. Can’t say, and won’t say.

Why should we vote for you?
Why not?

Terms you wish would start trending on Twitter right now?
#WhyBaldingMenAreSexier

What’s the most interesting connection you’ve made through Twitter?
Now following my wife.

Hashtag you created that you wish everyone used?
#FoodWishes4Life

How do you make your tweets unique?
I only type with my pinkies.

What inspires you to tweet?
Desperate need for attention and huge amounts of free time.

Ever get called out for tweeting too much?
Never. If anything, I’m surprised people don’t ask me to tweet more often. My tweets really are quite scintillating.

140 characters of advice for a new user?
Contrary to what most Twitter advisers say, I encourage new uses to tweet *more* when they’re drinking.

How long can you go without a tweet?
Approximately 2.7 hours

What question are we not asking here that we should?
What’s the deal with those Jersey Shore kids?

Who do you admire most for his or her use of Twitter?
Steven Colbert

Why’d you start tweeting?
All the cool kids were doing it.

Has Twitter changed your life? If yes, how?
Yes. Not sure.

What do you wish people would do more of on Twitter?
Follow me.

How will the world change in 2010?
Apparently, from what I hear, it will get about .03 degrees warmer.

What are some big Twitter faux pas?
Trying to sound smart by using pretentious terms like, “faux pas.”

What will the world be like 10 years from now?
It will be very similar to today, except people will cook at home much more often, thanks to the abundance of online cooking videos.

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Corned Beef and Cabbage – St. Patricks Meal


Corned Beef and Cabbage – More Jewish than Irish

It’s almost St. Patrick’s Day, and for many that means boiling up a nice authentic Irish dinner of corned beef and cabbage. The funny thing is, it’s not that Irish. How it came to be such an icon of Irish-American cuisine is not completely clear, but it goes a little something like this.

When Irish immigrants, fleeing the great potato famines, arrived in the Northeast they couldn’t find, or afford, the traditional cuts of meat used for their beloved braised dinner. The original Irish recipe actually used a type of lean bacon, made with a cut of pork similar to Canadian bacon.

Corned beef came into the picture as a lower-cost substitution, to replace the more expensive and harder to find cut. But, why corned beef? New York’s early immigrant populations lived in very crowded neighborhoods, and there was a close proximity between the Irish and Jewish communities.

If there is one thing that history has taught us (besides, do unto others as you would have them do unto you), it’s two ethnic groups living close to each other will always borrow from each other’s culinary traditions. This is a common theme in many of the world’s greatest recipes – the just posted Pork al Pastor was a perfect example.

By the way, I make a couple drinking jokes in the video, but I feel entitled since many of my closest friends and relatives have very deep Irish roots, and it’s all meant in good fun.

I actually think it’s terribly unfair that so many people believe the stereotype that all Irish people are heavy drinkers. It’s just not true – I know hundreds of Irish folks, and several of them don’t have a drinking problem. Enjoy!

Ingredients:
4-5 pound corned beef
spice packet
3 quarts water
1 onion, quartered
3 carrots, cut in large chunks
3 ribs celery, cut in 2-inch pieces
1 tsp salt
2 pounds red potatoes
1 small green cabbage, cut in 8ths
hot mustard and rye bread

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Corned Beef Hash I’m in Corned Beef Hash Heaven


Get the full story! Visit http://foodwishes.com to get the ingredients, and watch over 200 free video recipes. Leave me a comment there. If you have questions, ask on the website. Thanks!!

 

I’m in Corned Beef Hash Heaven

When I’m cooking corned beef, watching it simmer in the aromatic broth, I’ll sometimes close my eyes and picture the delicious plate of food I have coming. The funny thing is, it’s not the sliced corned beef and cabbage I’m dreaming of, it’s the corned beef hash I’m going to be making with the leftovers.

There are certain dishes I would never talk someone into trying, or argue on behalf of its virtues. It’s one of those, “there are two kinds of people in the world” things. Either you really love corned beef hash, or you don’t eat it. It’s not a dish for the indifferent.

Now, that the non-hash people have stopped reading, let’s talk crust. As you well know, what separates a great hash from a transcendent hash is the “crust.” You can’t rush a corned beef hash crust – it’s built slowly, over medium heat, with multiple turnings and pressings, the meat and potatoes crisped and caramelized in the combination of butter and beef fat.

I’ve always felt it’s a poached eggs greatest achievement to meet its end on a pile of perfectly crusty corned beef hash. In addition to the textural pleasures, it also features one of the food world’s greatest sights – the egg’s golden yolk slowly running over and through the steaming hash. They don’t know what they’re missing. Enjoy!

Ingredients:
1 tbsp butter
1 1/2 pounds cooked corned beef, diced
1 1/2 pounds white potatoes, peeled quartered
1/4 cup prepared roasted tomato salsa
2 clove garlic, crushed
1 bunch green onions, white parts chopped, green parts reserved for garnish
salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste

Here are some more great breakfast video recipe ideas!
Sausage and Egg Pizza
Lemon Soufflé Pancakes
The Hangtown Fry
“Flattata” with Bacon, Potatoes, and Greens
Fancy Restaurant-Style French Toast

 

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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