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How to Make Crepes – Even the Messed-Up Ones Will Be Perfect!


Crepe

Image via Wikipedia

How to Make Crepes – Even the Messed-Up Ones Will Be Perfect!

With a blog name like Food Wishes, and a closing video credit that asks, “what is your food wish?” – I do get lots of requests for video recipes. Probably the most common request that I hadn’t done yet was for a “how to make crepes” video. Well, today is the day. 

I’ve never understood the fear and mystery that surrounds this thin round of ground flour, milk, and egg. It’s one of the first things you make in culinary school (that works), and probably the first French recipe one commits to memory. It does take a few practice crepes to get a feel for the pan and heat, but once you have a couple successfully finished, you are set for life.

By the way, forget those scenes in movies, and TV, where the “chef” is flipping them in the air to turn them. This is all for show. Just use a spatula and turn them over – sort of like a toasted cheese sandwich. Also, stop being a perfectionist in the kitchen; you’ll have more fun. I know you; if you try these you want them to be perfectly round, perfectly thin, and perfectly colored. Relax, Martha.

Perfect rarely happens in the kitchen – before the food is plated, at least. The most imperfectly shaped crepe once folded up with jam, fried in butter, and eaten with ice cream, is always perfect. As I say in the video, this is just the first step. I will do another demo on what to do with these perfect crepes soon. Stay tuned, and enjoy!

Ingredients:
1 cup flour
2 eggs
1 1/4 cup milk
2 tbsp oil
1/4 tsp salt

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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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French Toast – The Fancy Brunch Restaurant Style Foodwishes Cooking Recipe


Pumpkin pain perdu or "lost bread" a...

Image via Wikipedia

French Toast – The Fancy Brunch Restaurant Style

So, you think you know how to make French toast? Maybe you beat a couple eggs, a splash of milk, a quick dip, fry it up in some butter, drizzle with a little syrup? Sounds pretty good, and for 95% of the world that is what they consider “French Toast.” But, if you want truly amazing French toast, give this classic restaurant method a try. 

The main difference is the bread is sliced thicker, it’s soaked in a custard batter (really, really soaked), and then after being brown slightly in a pan, it’s baked. That is the real secret. The baking cooks the custard inside the bread and gives it an unbelievable texture. The outside is crisp and golden, and the contrast between the two is magical. The problem with just pan-frying is by the time the inside is really cooked, the outside is too dark and bitter. You can use thinner bread, of course, but then you don’t get the same creamy, custardy, almost bread pudding-like texture, as from the thicker slices. Give this a try. The one extra step of baking it is sooo worth it. When you bite into this, I’m sure you’ll agree. Enjoy!

Ingredients:
6 thick slice of French bread
2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
pinch of salt
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp allspice
butter for frying
maple syrup?

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Chef interview with Foodwishes cook: Chef John


A Shorty Interview with Chef John

Thanks to many loyal readers of this blog, and my beloved YouTube channel fans, I’m proud to announce @FoodWishes (as I’m known on Twitter) is currently in 5th place for Shorty Awards nominations! I hear the top 5 finishers get an invite to NYC for the ceremony, so if you haven’t voted, here’s the link.

The following is an interview I did as part of the nomination process, and I thought I would repost it here. Enjoy!

What’s your best tweet?
I love them all. That’s like asking Octomom which child is her favorite.

What are six things you could never do without?
the other half of the twelve-pack

How do you use Twitter in your professional life?
To promote new (and totally awesome, if I do say) video recipes I’ve just produced.

What’s your favorite Twitter app?
What’s a Twitter app?

Twitter or Facebook?
Twitter! Facebook sucks. No offense.

What was the funniest trend you’ve seen?
Twitpics of food from really dark restaurants. It all looks like corned beef hash.

What feature should Twitter add?
With one click, you can delete another user’s Twitter account if you think it’s lame.

Who do you wish had a Twitter feed but doesn’t?
That guy that does the 6 Flags commercials.

What are some words or phrases you refuse to shorten for brevity?
“the” and “notwithstanding”

Is there someone you want to follow you who doesn’t already? If so, who?
Top Chef host @PadmaLakshmi. She has 19,428 followers and only follows 74 people. You do the math.

Have you ever unfollowed someone? Who and why?
Yes. Can’t say, and won’t say.

Why should we vote for you?
Why not?

Terms you wish would start trending on Twitter right now?
#WhyBaldingMenAreSexier

What’s the most interesting connection you’ve made through Twitter?
Now following my wife.

Hashtag you created that you wish everyone used?
#FoodWishes4Life

How do you make your tweets unique?
I only type with my pinkies.

What inspires you to tweet?
Desperate need for attention and huge amounts of free time.

Ever get called out for tweeting too much?
Never. If anything, I’m surprised people don’t ask me to tweet more often. My tweets really are quite scintillating.

140 characters of advice for a new user?
Contrary to what most Twitter advisers say, I encourage new uses to tweet *more* when they’re drinking.

How long can you go without a tweet?
Approximately 2.7 hours

What question are we not asking here that we should?
What’s the deal with those Jersey Shore kids?

Who do you admire most for his or her use of Twitter?
Steven Colbert

Why’d you start tweeting?
All the cool kids were doing it.

Has Twitter changed your life? If yes, how?
Yes. Not sure.

What do you wish people would do more of on Twitter?
Follow me.

How will the world change in 2010?
Apparently, from what I hear, it will get about .03 degrees warmer.

What are some big Twitter faux pas?
Trying to sound smart by using pretentious terms like, “faux pas.”

What will the world be like 10 years from now?
It will be very similar to today, except people will cook at home much more often, thanks to the abundance of online cooking videos.

 

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Crispy Onion Rings Recipe – How to Make Crispy Onion Rings


Learn how to make the Crispy Onion Rings Recipe! Get the ingredients here:http://foodwishes.blogspot.com/2010/0…
– Visit http://foodwishes.com to get more info, and watch over 350 free video recipes. Thanks and enjoy!

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2011 in Foodwishes

 

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Foodwishes Cooking Shrimp on Pink Salt – Cooking on Himalayan Pink Salt – Shrimp Recipe


Learn how to Cook Shrimp on Pink Salt! Visit http://foodwishes.blogspot.com/2011/0… for the ingredients! Plus, more info and over 500 additional original video recipes. I hope you enjoy this Cooking Shrimp on Pink Salt Recipe.

The actual recipe to this video:

Shrimp Cooked on Himalayan Pink Salt – I Sherpa Hope You Like It!

I’ve always wanted to cook something on Himalayan pink salt, but I just can’t for the life of me tell you why. I knew that flavor-wise there couldn’t be any real difference between cooking on pink salt, and simply seasoning with it, but that didn’t seem to matter. 

Just the idea of cooking on what’s basically a slab of crystal, appealed to some indefinable internal force inside of me. Having said that, I still reserve the right to continue to mock those people that wear crystals for their healing properties, because that’s just nuts.

Anyway, back to these shrimp. As I summarize in the video: it was fun, I’m glad I did it, but I don’t think I would do it again, unless it was for some showy, interactive first course.

There’s no doubt letting your guests cook their own shrimp on hot, pink salt would definitely be a neat way to start off a dinner party.

Above and beyond the Himalayan pink salt experiment, the ultra-simple shrimp preparation seen here can be easily adapted to your trusty non-crystal saute pan.

You’ll be pleasantly surprised how good seared shrimp are with nothing more than a pinch of cumin and cayenne. Just don’t forget the salt! Enjoy.

Note: After you cook on it, the salt block can be scraped clean, rinsed off (even though they said not to), and wiped dry. It’s a completely antiseptic surface and can be reused as many times as possible.

Ingredients:
1 pound large shrimp
1 teaspoon grapeseed oil
1/4 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
salt to taste if using conventional cooking methods


 
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Posted by on February 22, 2011 in Cooking, Foodwishes

 

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